Bringing Hope to those with ED after Prostate Cancer Surgery

By: Urology Care Foundation | Posted on: 30 Mar 2016

Bringing Hope to those with ED after Prostate Cancer Surgery

By funding research scholars like Trinity J. Bivalacqua, M.D, Ph.D. the Urology Care Foundation has brought major support to new treatments that improve patients' lives. Since funding our first research scholar in 1975, we've seen results that impact patients and their loved ones in a positive way.

Dr. Bivalacqua was awarded a Foundation Research Scholar Award in 2007. By 2012 he received a Rising Stars in Urology Research Award from the Foundation. These were key milestones in helping his research career hit full stride. Following the completion of his award, he joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

Dr. Bivalacqua and his team's research gave hope to some patients facing erectile dysfunction (ED) after prostate cancer surgery. Because some prostate cancers are treated by the removal of the prostate, patients may suffer from erectile dysfunction. This is due to the potential injury of the fibers (cavernous nerves) that allow the penis to be erect. Dr. Bivilacqua's research team successfully identified different phases of cavernous nerve decline following radical prostatectomy.

Using this information, his team is in the process of developing a hydrogel treatment. Using this gel may help to preserve cavernous nerve function, and would prevent erectile dysfunction following surgery.

"The Urology Care Foundation research funding that I have been fortunate to receive has provided the support needed to translate research discoveries at every level of my training into advances in treating urologic disease. The Urology Care foundation has supported so many young scientists over the years and with their continued support, the field of urology will continue to prosper and facilitate new research discoveries in urology."

Due to his Research Scholar award, Dr. Bivalacqua was given the opportunity to develop into an independent scientist, surgeon and leader in his field. It has also led to some major hope for many patients with surgery-related erectile dysfunction.

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